The Tokyo War Crimes Trial, U.Va.

The Tokyo War Crimes Trial

Digital Collection

Trial Media

The footage of the trial gathered here comprises prosecuting litigation, cross examinations, testimonies, spoken accounts of affidavits, and closing statements. As shown in the following videos, the subject matter examined in court is varied. The topics of concern include Japan's naval power, the Japanese attack on Pearl Harbor, the policy makers in Japan's government, the Japanese invasion of China, the Imperial Conference, Japanese-American negotiations, and the American case against the Japanese. Additionally, a recorded interview with Owen Cunningham, the defense attorney for Japanese Prime Minister Hideki Tojo can be accessed here. To watch a video, or listen to the interview, click on the title of the media you wish to explore.

IMTFE, First Photo of Allied Justices, 1946

Photograph of the first gathering of the justices of the International Military Tribunal for the Far East, 1946.

Law Archives Record

Trial of Tojo: Interview with Owen Cunningham, Part II

Owen Cunningham, defense attorney for Tojo, recounts his experiences during the trial in this oral interview included in the Iowa Oral History Project by the Des Moines Public Library. Cunningham begins with his background and selection to the defense team before going into great detail about the unfolding of the tribunal proceedings. This interview appears to have been conducted in the 1970s or 1980s. Each segment runs roughly 45 minutes in length. The audio clips have been published online at the Internet Archive by the Des Moines Public Library and are available here under the Creative Commons license: Attribution-Noncommercial-No Derivative Works 3.0

Trial of Tojo: Interview with Owen Cunningham, Part I

Owen Cunningham, defense attorney for Tojo, recounts his experiences during the trial in this oral interview included in the Iowa Oral History Project by the Des Moines Public Library. Cunningham begins with his background and selection to the defense team before going into great detail about the unfolding of the tribunal proceedings. This interview appears to have been conducted in the 1970s or 1980s. Each segment runs roughly 45 minutes in length. The audio clips have been published online at the Internet Archive by the Des Moines Public Library and are available here under the Creative Commons license: Attribution-Noncommercial-No Derivative Works 3.0

Captain James S. Chisholm answers questions put to him by prosecutor Colonel G. S. Woolworth at Tokyo War Crimes Trial

American prosecutor Colonel G. S. Woolworth continues the American case. A few defendants including Hideki Tojo seated in box. Defense attorney Joseph Howard makes an objection to a statement made against Koki Hirota by Colonel Woolworth. Defendants seated. Captain Van Meter swears in a new witness of the prosecution, Captain James S. Chisholm. Captain Chisholm answers questions put to him by Colonel Woolworth. Colonel Woolworth cross-examines Captain Chisholm.

US Navy Commander Cole presents American phase of Class B offenses at Tokyo War Crimes Trial

United States Navy Commander Cole presents American phase of Class B offenses and reads out the murder of three American airmen in Changsha, China, and the indiscriminate bombing of Hankow.

Defense attorney Brannon asks US Admiral James O. Richardson about statement attributed to Japanese Admiral Yamamoto during Tokyo War Crimes Trial

Defense attorney James Brannon asks US Admiral James O. Richardson about statement attributed to Japanese Fleet Admiral Isoroku Yamamoto. Questions center upon the proposal between Japan and the United States regarding naval power. Quotes from parts on how to carry on war most effectively. Mentions Nagano and Yamamoto.

US Admiral James O. Richardson gives figures on US and Japanese losses at Pearl Harbor during Tokyo War Crimes Trial

US Admiral James O. Richardson quotes from affidavit concerning Japanese Fleet Admiral Isoroku Yamamoto's plan to attack Pearl Harbor during World War II. Admiral Richardson gives figures on US and Japanese losses at Pearl Harbor and mentions USS Arizona (BB-39).

Prosecution talks about sending of Japanese troops into China during World War II at a Tokyo War Crimes Trial

Prosecuting attorney, Mr. Joseph B. Keenan, questions Japanese former Minister of Education Koichi Kido. Officials seated in the courtroom. Keenan attempts to establish that a Minister of Education in Japan was more than a title. It implies that he was a leading member of the government in formulating policy. He talks about sending Japanese troops into China by Kido serving under Prince Konoe's cabinet. Officials discuss amongst themselves.

Keenan tries to establish Koichi Kido's close ties with Prince Konoe during Tokyo War Crimes Trial

Prosecuting attorney, Mr. Joseph B. Keenan, questions Japanese former Minister of Education Koichi Kido. Officials seated in the courtroom. Keenan attempts to establish that a Minister of Education in Japan was more than a title. It implies that he was a leading member of the government in formulating policy. He talks about the relationship of Kido with Prince Fumimaro Konoe. He was a leading member of Prince Konoe's cabinet.

Mr. Joseph B. Keenan questions Kochi Kido during Tokyo War Crimes Trial

Prosecuting attorney, Joseph B. Keenan, questions Japanese former Minister of Education Koichi Kido. Officials seated in the courtroom. Discussion about the Imperial Conference and the attack on Pearl Harbor.

Discussion on the submission of proposals A and B by the Japanese during Tokyo War Crimes Trial

Japanese Prime Minister Hideki Tojo answers questions during the trials. Officials seated in the courtroom. An exchange between US Politician Joseph B. Keenan and Hideki Tojo on the submission of Proposals A and B, which were the last proposals to be submitted. The proposals were submitted to the US in an effort to keep the peace.

Discussion about the proposals given to the Japanese Empire

Japanese Prime Minister Hideki Tojo answers questions from the United States government officials seated in the court room. The US government and the high command decisions on the Japanese-American negotiations. Discussion about the proposals given to Japan and how they were the final measure. At one point, Tojo states that the translation produced by the United States regarding proceedings during the negotiations was incorrect.

Japanese Prime Minister Tojo being tried for his World War II crimes in Tokyo, Japan

Japanese Prime Minister Hideki Tojo answers questions during the trial. US Major General P. J. Mueller, Chief of Staff and party seated in the court room. Tojo is cross examined about the sending of troops into French Indochina. Tojo states that the Indochina problem was discussed in a message from President Roosevelt to the Emperor. In answer as to when troops were sent there, he says around September 20, 1940, and this was done after arrangements had been made with the Vichy Government of France.

The defendants in tribunal during Tokyo War Crime Trials

No sound. Views of defendants in the dock include: Admiral Takasumi Oka, General Akira Muto, Baron Kiichiro Hiranuma, General Hideki Togo, General Kenryo Sato, General Sadao Araki, Mamoru Shigemitsu, General Akira Muto, Admiral Shigetaro Shimada, Marquis Koichi Kido, Okinori Kaya, and Naoki Hoshino.

Joseph B. Keenan, the chief prosecutor, cross-examines Koichi Kido during Tokyo War Crimes Trials

The defense counsels listen as Keenan cross-examines Kido. Joseph B. Keenan, the chief prosecutor, questions Koichi Kido. Australian Sir William Webb, the tribunal's president, speaks to Keenan. Kido answers Keenan's questions. These questions pertain to Kido's interactions with the Emperor, Japan's intention to go to war with the United States and Great Britain, negotiations between Japan and the United States and the Imperial Conference in September.

Former Japanese Premier, Hideki Tojo, takes witness stand during Tokyo War Crimes Trials

Former Japanese Premier, Hideki Tojo, is escorted from the prisoners section to the witness box during the War Crimes Trials in Tokyo, Japan. An American officer reads the charges and a translator repeats them to Tojo, who stands and listens.

Comyns Carr questions Mrs. Yasuko Konoye

Mrs. Yasuko Konoye is sworn in and Arthur Comyns Carr then reads her statement on her involvement with the Saoinji-Harada diary. Mr. Brooks and Mr. Logan, both of the Defense team, make objections the version of the Saoinji-Harada diary excerpt Comyns Carr used with Mrs. Konoye.

Tavenner at lectern giving final summation during Tokyo War Crimes Trials

Tavenner gives the final summation in the Prosecution's case against the Japanese defendants. Some quotes include: "They planned to extend their domination and control . . . These defendants were not mere automatons, they were not replaceable cogwheels in a machine, they were not playthings of fate caught in a maelstrom of destiny from which there was no extrication. These men were the brains of an empire, they were the leaders of the nation's destiny . . . They made their choice, for this choice they must bear the guilt." He also compares the accused to the defendants at Nuremberg saying they "were not the dregs of society and the underworld" as were the German accused. Instead, "these people were supposed to be the elite of the nation, honest and trustworthy. They voluntarily elected to follow the path of war." Upon conclusion, Sir William Webb dismisses the court until judgment has been decided. Shows judges, lawyers, defendants and audience leaving the courtroom.