The Tokyo War Crimes Trial, U.Va.

The Tokyo War Crimes Trial

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Japan - Economic Situation

Doc. No. 1619 - Analysis of Documentary Evidence

Contributors: 
Description: 
Analysis of World Significance of the Dutch East Indies. Crimes to which Document Applicable: Preparing Japanese opinion for war. "Summary of relevant points: Pamphlet, by International Thought Research Laboratory, was written by MIZUSHIMA, Hitoshi, as an argument for Japan's control of the Dutch East Indies, to help establish the "Greater East Asia Co-Prosperity Sphere." /A.N. An attempt to rationalize Japan's need of D. E. I.)"
Date: 
1946CE May 14th

Doc. No. 1615 - Analysis of Documentary Evidence

Contributors: 
Description: 
Analysis of The Southern Co-Prosperity Sphere. Crimes to which document applicable: Preparation of Japanese opinion for war. Summary of relevant points: Book, by HAYASAKA, Yoshio, gives an economic, political, and geographic description of French Indo China, Thailand, Malaya, Dutch East Indies, and the Philippine Islands. Explains why Japan had to form a bloc of these areas to protect her new order in Asia, and that should America attempt to curb Japan's southward expansion, war would be inevitable.
Date: 
1946CE May 14th

Doc. No. 1108 - Analysis of Documentary Evidence

Contributors: 
Description: 
Analysis of Book, "Business Reports, 1938" (Volume 1). Persons implicated: HIROTA; ARITA; OSHIMA; UGAKI; OTT. Crimes to which document applicable: Economic aggression in Northern and Middle China.
Date: 
1946CE Apr 2nd

Revised Deadline Dates

Description: 
Lists deadlines for Chinese Military Aggression Including Atoricites, Opium and Narcotics, Economic Aggression, Relations with Germany and Italy, Relations with Russia, Preparations for War, Relations with U.S. & Great Britain, Relations with Netherlands,
Date: 
1946CE Jun 28th

Tribunal Opposes Defense Questions Implicating West News Article

Description: 
Reports on the defense team's attempt to implicate that "powerful British and American commercial interests" created "the situation which forced Japan to become an aggressor in China." This attempt came during Capt. Alfred W. Brooks cross-examination of Gen. Ching Teh-chun. Sir William Webb stopped this line of questioning "on the ground that the matter was 'entirely too remote.'" When Brooks countered with claims of economic aggression by other countries, Webb answered "economic aggression is not a crime." Webb ultimately refused to allow Brooks to continue with his line of questioning. The article reports on the rest of Teh-chun's testimony, including questions about Pearl Harbor, the Sian Incident, and the Marco Polo Bridge Incident.

Japanese Trade Studies, Special Industry Analysis No. 26 - Wool and Wool Manufactures

Contributors: 
Description: 
Report prepared for the Foreign Economic Administration by a member of the staff of the United States Tariff Commission. This study focuses on the role of Wool and Wool Manufactures in Japan's economy. Entered as Defense Document 500-A-26. Handwritten note states "Reproduce all 7 items. Smith." Gives an overview of Japanese imports and exports of raw wool as well as wool fabrics. States "As Japan does not produce raw wool to any [unclear] extent, the requirements of this material are almost fully met by imports." Discusses changes over time and includes tables with supporting data. [Note: Date field reflects when the original document was written and not the date the IPS reproduced the document for inclusion in evidence]
Date: 
1945CE Aug

Japanese Trade Studies, Special Industry Analysis No. 23 - Lumber

Contributors: 
Description: 
Report prepared for the Foreign Economic Administration by a member of the staff of the United States Tariff Commission. This study focuses on the role of Lumber in Japan's Economy. Handwritten note states "Reproduce All. Smith." Describes the history of lumbering as well as the types of forests found in Japan. States "Substantial quantities of timber exist in Manchuria (Manchoukuo), Korea (Chosen), and Formosa (Taiwan), but, to a large extent, the timber is inaccessible and lumber production has been inadequate for domestic requirements. Japan's exports of lumber to these areas has greatly exceeded imports from them." Wood played an important role in Japan's economy as most people preferred wooden houses. Gives overview of historic trends, including production, imports and exports during the war. Predicts that imports will continue to be important in the postwar years. [Note: Date field reflects when the original document was written and not the date the IPS reproduced the for inclusion in evidence]
Date: 
1945CE Jul

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