The Tokyo War Crimes Trial, U.Va.

The Tokyo War Crimes Trial

Digital Collection

Japanese-Chinese Relations

Doc. No. 885 - Analysis of Documentary Evidence

Contributors: 
Description: 
Analysis of Sealed treaty of 24 Feb 1939 between Japan, Germany, Italy and Manchukuo making Manchukuo a member of the Anti-Communist Internationale. Persons implicated: UEDA; CHANG CHING HUI; WAGNER; CORTESE.
Date: 
1946CE Mar 18th

Doc. No. 1274 - Analysis of Documentary Evidence

Contributors: 
Description: 
Analysis of Photostats: Telegrams exchanged between Foreign Ministry in Berlin and Embassies in Hankow, Tokyo, Washington and Consulate in Shanghai. Persons implicated: HIROTA; KOKI; TOGO. Crimes to which document applicable: Aggressive warfare against China; Violation of Nine Power Treaty.
Date: 
1946CE Apr 11th

Doc. No. 1393 - Analysis of Documentary Evidence

Contributors: 
Description: 
Analysis of Telegram #513, KURUSU (Berlin) to ARITA (Tokyo). Persons implicated: ARITA; KURUSU. Crimes to which document applicable: Affairs with China. Summary of relevant points: "KURUSU urges settlement of the CHINA Incident in view of grave world situation."
Date: 
1946CE Apr 17th

Japanese Forces Said Unprepared for China Affair News Article

Description: 
Reports on the testimony of General Hayao Tada who told the Tribunal that "no plans for the Pacific War were made during his tenure of office as Vice-Chief of General Staff between August, 1937 and December, 1938." He repeatedly emphasized that "fighting in China had broken out spontaneously." The prosecution objected to his testimony and brought up the earlier affidavit given by Colonel David D. Barrett who "believed that the incident at Wanping, near Marco Polo Bridge, was the 'carefully prepared excuse for the second stage of Japan's undeclared war on China.'" Also discusses the defense cross-examination of Wang Len-chai, magistrate of Wanpinghsian and the introduction of the prosecution's witness, A. A. Dorrance, "formerly manager of the Standard Oil Company in Hankow."

Discord Prevalent on China Incident, Defendant Reveals News Article

Description: 
Reports on Kenryo Sato's thoughts regarding Japan's policy towards the China Incident. Sato served as the Press Section Chief of the War Ministry. In a series of speeches entered into evidence, the Tribunal heard about the disorganized policy and the "disagreement among the governmental ministries." In addition, other excerpts told of "a number of efforts to bring about peace including an attempt at mediation by the German Ambassador in Tokyo, as well as peace feelers by Chiang Kai-shek." Also describes Hachiro Arita's role regarding China and that the prosecution's submission of evidence "created such a wrangle that the court proceedings were reduced to a snail's pace."

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