The Tokyo War Crimes Trial, U.Va.

The Tokyo War Crimes Trial

Digital Collection

Precedents (International Law)

Japanese Treaty Analysis Project

Contributors: 
Description: 
Gives an overview of responsibilities and tasks assigned to the Japanese Treaty Analysis Project members who are charged with "determining violations of treaties entered into by Japan with other nations." Incidents to be examined include: 1. The Mukden Incident and Manchuria; 2. Marco Polo Bridge and North China; 3. Spratly Islands; 4. Establishment of the Nanking Government; 5. French Indo-China; 6. Thailand; 7. Singapore and Malaya; 8. Mandated Islands; 9. Naval Limitations Treaty; 10. Hawaiian Islands; 11. Miscellaneous.
Date: 
1945CE Oct 1st

Doc. No. 106 Supp. - Analysis of Documentary Evidence

Contributors: 
Description: 
Analysis of Copy, Identic Communication to the Netherlands by Signatories to Quadruple Pacific Treaty. Crimes to which document applicable. Summary of relevant points: "Treaty concluded 13 Dec 1921, by U. S., G. B., France and Japan, to maintain rights to their insular possessions in the Pacific Ocean and to respect the rights of the Netherlands in such region."
Date: 
1946CE May 31st

Doc. No. 104 Supp. - Analysis of Documentary Evidence

Contributors: 
Description: 
Analysis of Copy, "Convention for Pacific Settlement of International Disputes." Persons implicated: SATO. Crimes to which document applicable: Aggression. Summary of relevant points: "Treaty is for friendly settlement of international disputes, and to extend "the empire of law and of strengthening the appreciation of international justice."
Date: 
1946CE May 31st

Japs' Defender Argues A-Bomb Was Murder, Too News Article

Description: 
Reports on the statements of defense attorney Major Bruce Blakeney who asserted that "America's atom bombing of Hiroshima was no less murderous than Japan's attack on Pearl Harbor." Chief Prosecutor Joseph B. Keenan offered a quick rebuttal stating "we make no apologies for the use of the atomic bomb against Japan." He further argued, regarding the validity of the Tribunal, that "the lack of precedent . . . should not be used as an escape hatch for the guilty." The article also discusses the motion submitted by W. G. Furness to have four of the accused military generals tried by court martial rather than an international tribunal.

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