The Tokyo War Crimes Trial, U.Va.

The Tokyo War Crimes Trial

Digital Collection

Japanese Aggression in Manchuria

Propaganda for War Brought Up at Trial News Article

Description: 
Reports on the testimony of Nobumi Ito, former President of the Board of Information, regarding the use of propaganda to prepare the Japanese populace of war with the United States and Great Britain. Describes in detail the actions taken by the Japanese government to use propaganda as early as 1930 to build support for action in Manchuria. Also testifying to the use of propaganda was former Education Minister Tamon Mayeda who asserted that Shumei Okawa was "one of the leading writers of that period, urging expansion and control of Manchuria." Other materials submitted into evidence by the prosecution to build their case regarding the use of propaganda included "a set of paper theatrical pictures which Akio Saki, president of the Nippon Kamishibai Kaisha, claimed were shown to children throughout Japan." The end of the article addressed ongoing translation concerns voiced by the defense.

Pu Yi Here to Testify at Trials News Article

Description: 
Reports on the arrival of Henry Pu Yi, Japanese puppet ruler of Manchuria, at the Atsugi airport. He flew in from Russia (where was being held in custody) and was expected to testify sometime late in the following week before the tribunal. The article concluded that "Pu Yi's testimony is expected to throw a searching light on details of a history known only by broad outline."

Pu Yi Expected in Tokyo to Testify at War Trials Under Russian Custody News Article

Description: 
Reports that Pu Yi, Japanese puppet ruler of Manchuria for 11 years, will testify before the International Military Tribunal for the Far East. States that Pu Yi will remain in Russian custody at all times. Gives a brief background of Pu Yi's rule in Manchuria and states that his whereabouts have been unknown since Russia overran Manchuria in 1945.

Map of Distribution of Japanese Manchuria and Mongolia (1928)

Description: 
Summary of map according to defense document number 260 exhibit description: "It could be pointed out that though the total Japanese population of Manchuria in 1928 is only given as 206,203, the 101,000 Japanese living in Kwantung Leased Territory were actually under Japanese rule and another 88,000 in the SMR zone were under Japanese military protection. Hence the bona fide Japanese settlers at this time numbered only about 16,000 persons."
Date: 
1928CE

Certificate of Source of Document

Description: 
Certificate of source of a document for defense document 260: a publication "compiled by the headquarters of the Kwantung Army, consisting of 3 pages and 9 sheets of diagrams, and entitled 'Reference to the Problems of Manchuria and Mongolia.'"
Date: 
1947CE Feb 4th

Nippon Times - August 8, 1946

Description: 
Nippon Times, No. 17,023 from Thursday, August 8, 1946. On front page are two articles relating to the tribunal: 1. "Pu Yi Expected in Tokyo to Testify at War Trials Under Russian Custody"and 2. "Japanese Forces Said Unprepared for China Affair; Prosecution Witness Testified Pacific War Plans Were Not in Existence in 1938." Other articles in the newspaper report on international affairs.
Date: 
1946CE Aug 8th

Nippon Times - July 10, 1946

Description: 
Nippon Times No. 16,994 from Wednesday, July 10, 1946. Topics covered include reports on the tribunal's progress regarding the Manchurian Phase (and Mukden Incident), the current Japanese government, movement of Jews into Poland, the expulsion of 54,000 Austrians from Russia, election in Mexico, affairs in the Soviet Union, and general international affairs.
Date: 
1946CE Jul 10th

Document No. 1909

Description: 
Transcripts and summaries related to Japanese propaganda films "Glorious Japan" found on 3 reels (and divided into four parts). "Glorious Japan" was "dedicated to the people of Japan, as a historical record of Japan's efforts for the past two years for peace in the Orient." Lists the individuals involved in its production.

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